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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
blow in their own backyard. >>> a new movie has controversy surrounding around the cia analyst credited with finding osama bin laden and a sex abuse verdict topples the wall of secrecy that surrounded an ultraorthodox jewish sect. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> first this just coming into cnn. word that michigan's governor has just signed a law that many believe will significantly weaken union power in the state. one of the organized labor movements few remaining strongho strongholds. there was massive protests as lawmakers approved a so-called right to work law which allows members to forego paying dues. poppy harlow is in lansing in the state capital for us. you just spoke to the governor about all of this. what did he tell you? >> reporter: well, i spoke with the governor just ahead of that announcement where he confirmed that he indeed did sign this legislation into lawmaking michigan a right to work state. a sea change for this state, wolf. the governor saying this is a "opportunity" to stand up for workers and flying in the face of what many of those workers
the decision to close the c.i.a. annex, the c.i.a. operation in benghazi, was made early morning hours of september 12 about eight or nine hours after the first wave of the attacks hit the night before. fox was told the c.i.a. site was sanitized so that all of the classified material, the classified equipment, was either destroyed or removed in a 12-hour window and we asked the lawmakers about this. they have not wanted to discuss it on camera but they are indicating this shows you where a lot of the focus was in those hours after the attack, very much on the annex and c.i.a. operation. >>trace: thank you, catherine, from capitol hill. the sea port strike that cost southern californian estimated $1 billion a day is over. workers at the ports of los angeles and long beach walked off the job a week ago and many cargo ships had to change course or simply line up until the ports re-open. for retailers this could not have come as a worse time because they rely on this sea port for a holiday good like clothing and if unture and electronics. both now have struck a deal. adam is like at the po
in a multimedia presentation with drone surveillance and video from the consulate of the cia and annex. >> this is supposed to be sovereign u.s. territory, and if people walk in on us like that without resistance really makes your blood boil because you think to yourself what's the security? >> a video was shown to the committee last month, but this is the first time the presentation was made to the entire house. one lawmaker who asked not to be identified who said in the classified naturr of the breech r, the video who assess because the attacker is casual. fox news told james clapper, the nation's top intelligence official emphasized, the attacker's motivation unknown, and there was further questions about the obama administration's singular and immediate focus on the anti-islam video? >> why did you just focus on that part for so long rather than say, look, it's not a black and white issue. >> one of the motivations may very well be either the video, the response to the video in cairo, and, certainly, that's not ruled out. >> fox news has confirmed the decision to shut down the cia
? >> reporter: fox news has learned that the cia as well as other intelligence agencies have been working with libyan militias after it was claimed qaddafi's program was not shut do i know idown in 2004. u.s. officials are insisted there's quote, no quid pro quo on the search, including the movement of weapons. tonight the cia had no public comment on fox's reporting. >> shepard: thanks very much. >>> an enormously popular mexican american singer and reality star now confirmed dead after a plane crash. investigators say jenni rivera was among the passengers on a private leer jet that slammed into the ground shortly after taking off in northern mexico. rivera's brother said there's almost nothing left of that plane. >> the plane is totaled. nobody inside survived. the bodies are unrecognizable according to what they're telling us. monterey officials are saying that they need at least a couple of time, a couple of days to be able to bring the bodies from the wilderness. it's out in the middle of nowhere. >> shepard: somebody took a photo of what appears to be jenni rivera's driver's license
out where he was. and a cia team is responsible for that. >> right. >> and then it's the story of how they went in there and killed him. >> yes. >> the first part of the story centers around actress jessica chastain plays a cia person. is that a real person? >> well, again, they're all based on real people. >> right. so there is a real cia agent that she plays who found the link to the courier who took them. >> with her tenacity, her courage and her dedication, you know, really drove that lead forward. and gave it a lot of traction. you know, and i think the interesting thing about the movie is it really puts you in her shoes. it puts you in that intelligence hunt and gives you a glimpse into the intelligence community and the dedication of these men and women including her. but all the men and women that are involved in something -- in an operation that is this complicated and this arduous. >> have you met her, or did mark meet her? >> well, we protect our sources. i'll leave it at that. >> you know, were you surprised that there was a woman who was so intricately involved? because a
questions as well. i would point to the issue over the cia talking points and these decisions to make changes that critics say really minimize the role of al qaeda and affiliated groups in this attack, martha. martha: certainly got the right people in the room to answer a lot of those questions. we'll see if they get anywhere conclusive today. you know one of the big issues that has been raised by all of this of course, catherine, is our intelligence on the ground in benghazi. what are we learning about the future of that annex and our presence there? >> reporter: fox news has learned that the decision to close the cia annex and to destroy all of the classified information and move out the classified communications equipment came within 12 hours, 12 hours of the at dark -- attack on the consulate itself and early morning september 12th, by 8:00 local time, effectively the cia operation in benghazi was shuttered. all the classified information was moved or burned as well as the equipment and this was a decision fox was told was made on the ground. then there was notification to washing
: a year ago, iran did manage to down a c.i.a. drone that apparently crossed the border from afghanistan. and last month, the u.s. military said another drone came under fire by iranver the persian gulf. it s undamaged. in afghanistan, a bomb blast has killed two nato troops in the country's south. the alliance says the attack happened yesterday. it did not provide the nationalities of those killed. so far this year at least 384 international troops have been killed in afghanistan. most of them have been americans. in economic news, the u.s. housing market showed more signs of recovery in a new report by the real estate data firm, core logic. it said home prices in october were up more than 6% compared with last year. that's the largest gain in more than six years. still, the housing news was not enough to boost wall stre's irits. stocks edged lower again as budget talks in washington showed no signs of progress. the dow jones industrial average lost more than 13 points to close at 12,951. the nasdaq fell five points to close at 2996. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back
in the world. our cia are out there all over the world but they have to get information. they collect it and analyze it. look at what happened in benghazi. that's another issue. we knew that it was a hot spot, but we didn't have intelligence that they were going to attack. >> greta: therein proves my point. that was another intelligence where we might have the hardest working people in the world, the best in the world but the fact is intelligence failures do happen with even the best. that's why it's very hard to have a lot of sort of comfort in terms of what happens with these, you know, chemical weapons should assad leave. >> no question. >> greta: mistakes happen. >> we can't be the sheriff for the whole world, so we have to work with other countries an other allies. as serious as the situation is in syria, we've got to work with russia. >> greta: let me ask you a quick question. you've actually met president assad. tell me your impression. >> on our way to iraq we had to go -- we were asked to go and stop by to see assad. this was right after, maybe six months after president obam
wire is a sports analyst. chad sweet is a former cia director of operations. and ken baer is a white housed a virus. todd carmichael is the host of dangerous grounds. howard kurtz will join us. and economic diane swonk rounds things out for us today. "starting point" begins right now. >>> good morning. welcome, everybody. let's begin with developing news this morning. a tsunami threat to tell you about was just lifted in japan. the country was rocked by a powerful 7.3 magnitude earthquake. it hit off the coast of tokyo. the buildings there shaking. you could see some of the video showing the degree to which they were shaking. alex, what's the latest? >> reporter: it has been a very, very tense few hours here in japan after you mentioned a 7.3 magnitude earthquake striking late here in the day on friday. but just in the past 90 minutes or so, the all clear has been given. the tsunami warning has been lifted. that's great news for the people here. there's no signs of any significant damage. no reports of any deaths. just a few injuries at this point. we also have to keep in mind the nu
evidence that some of the shoulder-fired missiles that the c.i.a. was trying to track down in libya, and f-16's may have migrated to syria bringing down a helicopter and fighter jet last week. reports that save gas has been loaded on to canisters, the united states set up a task force at a base north of jordan, in amman, that included 150 special forces working with the military of jordan to secure assad's chemical weapons. >> the world is watching. the president of the united states has made very clear there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a tell mistake by using the chemical weapons on their own people. >>reporter: the pentagon is aware a meeting of rebel groups elected a 30-member military command structure and two-thirds is made up with ties to the muslim brotherhood. >>shepard: and damascus and the airport is in the middle of a war zone. fighters declared the airport is "a legitimate target, approach at your own risk." grueling battles today on streets of the capital city. this video showing someone trying to put at the flames which engulfed the car. fox cannot confirm
of the cia. cedrick layton member of the joipt staff. what are those consequences? is the u.s. going to passing the point of no return here? >> well, it is, look, the most recent information suggests they're preparing to be able to launch these warheads containing gas and other chemical weapons. that's a problem because now, a military strike could trigger the dissemination of such weapons. what you have to do now is is get the timely tactical intelligence to interrupt the decision cycle. that is get between assad and the individual who presses the button to launch that missile. that's a very ask, very difficult, but now, that's the position we're really in. >> just to be honest, hasn't really seemed to be at least totally aware of everything happening every step of the way here. >> okay, except there was a wmd commission that looked at the failures in iraq and strengthened the committee. there are standards for assessing the credibility of sources. for how an analyst assesses a source and the information. and we know from the president's action against bin laden, he will ask the har
was -- after he won the election, and that is that the cia program, whether you find it repugnant or not, actually was effective with ksm and other people getting actionable intelligence that led to couriers that led eventually years later to the killing of osama bin laden. >> joe and mika, i saw a screening of the film on friday, and then i had breakfast on saturday with the screenwriter. it is powerful precisely because it just walks you through the story of what happened. and you can make all of the moral and political arguments that you want about what our policy on torture should be. this just tells you the story of what happened. there's no question in the record that the film shows and in other research that i've done that the name of the courier who led us to bin laden's hideout in abbottabad emerged in these harsh interrogations. and there's a weird way in watching this film in which every viewer will feel complicit in that process in a weird way. you're watching, hoping that they get the name, hoping that somehow you get enough information for the united states to act. it's a r
? the white house, the cia? rice herself. today in a tv interview president obama pointed fingers at us. >> republicans attacks against un ambassador susan rice boxed you in a corner, would it look like a sign of weakness if you didn't appoint her to secretary of state? >> i don't really spend a lot of time on, you know, what folks say on cable news programs attacking highly qualified personnel like susan rice. i'm going to make a decision about who is going to be the best secretary of state. > >> greta: you heard right. president obama blaming cable news for the ambassador's problem. what do you think about that? go to gretawire.com. we're back in ninety seconds. impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. ro price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and conside
is to blame for rice's problems? the white house, the cia? rice herself. today in a tv interview president obama pointed fingers at us. >> republicans attacks against un ambassador susan rice boxed you in a corner, would it look like a sign of weakness if you didn't appoint her to secretary of state? >> i don't really spend a lot of time on, you know, what folks say on cable news programs attacking highly qualified personnel like susan rice. i'm going to make a decision about who is going to be the best secretary of state. > >> greta: you heard right. president obama blaming cable news for the ambassador's problem. what do you think about that? go to gretawire.com. i had enough of feeling embarrassed about my skin. [ designer ] enough of just covering up my moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. i decided enough is enough. ♪ [ spa lady ] i started enbrel. it's clinically proven to provide clearer skin. [ rv guy ] enbrel may not work for everyone -- and may not clear you completely, but for many, it gets skin clearer fast, within 2 months, and keeps it clearer up to 9 months. [ male announc
. is it too late? national security contributor fran townsend is a member of the cia and homeland security external advisory board and colonel cedric layton is a member of the staffs. what are the consequences? is the u.s. going to passing the point of no return here? >> it is. the most recent information suggests they're actually preparing to be able to launch these warheads containing sarin gas and other chemical weapons. that's a problem, right? now a military strike could inadvertently trigger the dissemination of such weapons, what you have to do is get the intelligence to interrupt the decision cycle. get between assad and the individual who presses the button to launch that missile. that's a very big ask from the intelligence community and very difficult. that's the positive we're really in. >> the intelligence community which to be honest hasn't really seemed to be at least, you know, totally aaware of everything happening every step of the way here. >> okay, except there's been -- there was a commission that looked at the failures in iraq and strengthened the intelligence communit
. possibly for the pentagon or cia. we don't know how serious that is. so far, it's all the same circle. >> that's right. >> musical chairs. >> musical chairs. the knock a lot of people in washington give to the obama white house it is too insular and he doesn't pull the kinds of expertise he needs into this white house. there's an opportunity in this second term for him to shake things up a little bit. you know, maybe to bring in new players, new faces who have been there from the clinton white house, and kind of help the dynamic and help the governing because a lot of people on capitol hill even democrats will tell you, he's not good at governing and building coalitions. maybe if he brought some folks in who knew how to do that there would be more give and take on the fiscal cliff issue, on the tax reform and entitlement reforms that we get next year, and there is a sense he really could use a bit of some fresh blood to make things a little easier going forward. >> chris, susan, and ari, thank you very much for all joining us. and the jobs report, more jobs are added in november than
of the shoulder-fired missiles known as manpads which the cia were trying to track and contain in libya, may have migrated to syria, bringing down a syrian fighter jet and helicopter last week. then there are reports of chemical weapons, sarin gas being loaded into canisters for possible use. the u.s. set up a task force at a base north of ammon, jordan with 150 u.s. special forces working on a plan to secure assad's chemical weapons. >> the whole world is watching, the whole world is watching very closely and the president of the united states has made very clear there will be consequences, there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a terrible mistake by using these chemical weapons on their own people. >> reporter: earlier this year the pentagon estimated it would take 75,000 ground troops to secure the tons of chemical weapons in assad's possession. that is it more than the number of u.s. troops in afghanistan right now. in the meantime, the administration's public statements appear designed to at least deter the assad regime from using them. next week in an international conference
have her testifying and oversight and government reform, and after the cia, the dod and everyone else has issued their time line. and they say now m why going to give you my two cents. now you have heard everything and if you limit it to the report of the people that she engaged to write a report, what are her risks? >> james clapper is the director of national intelligence and he has contridicted himself before congress. now when you do that. >> he may be in trouble. you know what, when he went back and forth on these statements who took the word al-qaeda out and that kind of thing, somebody had to take the fall here. you know the president was not going to let susan rice do. it she went on national television and said what every one of us knew not to be true. there is someone who had to take the fall. >> four people here were killed. and there is an abundance of evidence that those people and others in benghazi warned the state department and the u.s. government that their lives were in danger. they begged for help. they begged for protection. it was not given. a lawyer would grab o
of terrorist ties. phillip mudd, a former cia and fbi counterterrorism official, says there's a huge concern over who to trust with chemical weapons. >> when you've got roughly 10% of the opposition in the. >>>s u.s. government is declaring are terrorist group you're going to be concerned. in any case like this, there's a lot of risk. >> reporter: but mudd says it's still better to train the rebels on how to handle those materials than to do nothing. and leonard specter says the u.s. and its allies are likely screening the individuals who are being trained very carefully, wofrl, at least that's the hope. >> despite all that, there's still a potential for these chemical weapons getting into the wrong hands. despite what the u.s. is trying to do. >> reporter: phillip mudd says if the syrian regime loses control of these weapons, that's a huge worry. if they fall into the hands of others who are not trusted by the u.s. or its allies they could float around the border to iraq or other potentially dangerous places where they don't have control over these things. if assad loses control of these th
of the cia instead. and get this. the reason why he said -- this was a 90-minute conversation he had with fox news national security analyst, kathleen mcfarland who went on ailes' behest to pitch this. petraeus said at the time my wife would divorce me if i decided to run. i love my wife. we have a beautiful house with his and hers bathrooms, believe it or not. i just want to live in it. i've never spent a night in it. >> he was doing other things, i guess. >>> it's also raising an interesting debate. should the head of a news organization be actively involved in recruiting candidates for president? obviously, you know, in this day and age, we know which network leans left, which network leans right. should you be that actively involved to say i will quit to run someone's campaign? it raises an interesting debate and media circles, i think, as well. >> rogers ailes denies this, saying the strategist that went on his behalf to pitch this. that sonny was way out of line. and zero chance he would leave fox. the money was too good. that's what we say about our jobs. >> yes, that's exactly what we
experience in the cia, how would you approach even solving this mystery in front of us right now? >> i mean, it has to come from intelligence. i doubt that the fbi, as good of work as they really do, are going to get the answers they need talking to libyan witnesses. this has to come through clandestine sources, technical means that'll allow us to pinpoint who did this. you're going to be listening to intercepts and things along this line which will allow you to act. i don't want to act against people who are not responsible for this, but i think after three months considering we have the world's best intelligence agencies and investigators, it's troubling to me, i'm disappointed that we haven't been able to bring these people to justice. and like i said, this is sending a terrible signal to folks around the world. and, you know, rick just mentioned mali. that's a place that's becoming an al-qaeda state. jenna: and youty they're -- do you think there's a connection there? why? >> it's a result of what happened in libya, because after the revolution was over in the libya, the arab spring upr
, last night, a former cia officer, robert bear, was speaking to anderson cooper. he described what the use of sarin could do. here's more of what he had to say. >> one round and the dispersion on that could be -- depends on the wind -- but you could take out, let's say a city like homs, you could take out a third of the city in the first couple of hours. anderson, this is a highly toxic liquid. it's a persistent agent. it's absolutely completely deadly. >> reporter: now, we've heard repeatedly from u.s. administration officials, u.s. president barack obama, u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton that the use of chemical weapons in syria was a red line for which syria and the bashar al assad regime would face severe consequences if they ever did cross that red line and utilize chemical weapons against the people of syria. >> and we have no idea what those severe consequences would be, right? >> reporter: that's right, we don't. you know, people speculate that this would mean some type of military intervention, but we also know that a lot of world powers have not wanted to intervene
's keeping his own council abthat. he's alleges got the cia slot to fill as well. there are rumors there may be changes on his national security team. but nobody is being very specific about it at this point. >> shira, just the optics of the gop engaged in -- in a days-long filibuster with regards to susan rice, attacking susan rice for days. is that a fight that they want to pick? >> you'd think they wouldn't want to pick this fight, especially when there are other well-qualified people who want to be secretary of state such as john kerry, the senator of massachusetts, has made no secret at all that this is a position he's wanted far really long time. so you think this would not be a battle the white house would pick. but obviously the president has a lot of loyalty to susan rice. his defense of her a couple weeks ago from the podium was really unique and frankly defensive. so if this is who he wants, he has every right to nominate her and the senate has every right to say no. >> david, before i let you guys get out of here, i had katon dawson on a few minutes ago. saturdays we like to enga
to the cia and department of homeland security. general marks, let me start with you. what are the military options at this stage right now? realistically, what could the use, nato, the international community militarily do if there is an indication that the syrian military's about to use chemical weapons against its own people. >> wolf, that's the key point. in advance of its use what can the u.s. do? and it's clearly having a very robust, very broad intelligence collection apparatus that takes into account all means of collection, technical as well as human intelligence. there are known sites where the chemical weapons are stockpiled, where the production sites are. then there has to be an act to marry those up with the distribution or delivery means. >> a missile. >> a missile, artillery shell, put into a bomb then uploaded under the wings of an aircraft. all those are indicators of what might occur. intelligence has to be very, very robust in order to go after that. then, if it is such that we see that happening in a tactical sense, in other words, there's not much time to respond, we h
in the muslim countries and leadership changes in the arab spring countries. former cia specialist is joined by the washington journal's editorial page devotee and others, the foundation for the offensive democracy hosts this event. it's just over an hour. [applause] >> good morning, everyone. thank you for that introduction and thank you, all of you for coming out early this morning for what i think will be very lively debate. we are going to be asking the question of democracy is the triumph in the middle east islamic victory is unavoidable and essentials. this is the motion that we will be debating in the intelligence square format for the requests from ruel and brian. they have had a practice round. occurred on power. the revolution in egypt has taken many turns. the muslim brotherhood has come to power through the ballot box, but that has been marred of late thanks to mohamed morsi, the president of egypt earning him the moniker on atwitter of morsilini or mubarak with a beard, and now as we look around, we are not sure where this revolution is going and nor are we aware were the of the
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)